Illustrator CC – The Tale of the Two Arrows

February 26, 2015 § Leave a comment

Students new to using Adobe Illustrator often wonder why there are two different selection arrows to choose from.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 1.09.23 PMThe easiest way to explain the two arrows is the black arrow is for large gestures and the white arrow is for fine tuning.  The black arrow is referred to as the selection tool and the white arrow is the direct selection tool.  Use the selection tool (black arrow) to move, resize, and rotate objects.  You can also select multiple objects and enter into groups with this tool.  The direct selection tool can be used to move an object or path (line), select any of the points on a path, manipulate any of these points, and manipulate handles.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 1.10.28 PMIn the above image we used the selection tool to highlight the curve.  Notice the two ends are highlighted as well as the curve itself.  With this tool you can move this curve anywhere on the canvas.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 3.42.24 PMIn the above image the direct selection tool was used to highlight the curve.  Notice two “handles” appeared at the the endpoints of the curve.  You can use these endpoints to manipulate the shape of the curve by moving them, like in the image below.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 1.12.14 PMThere are many other uses for each arrow.  Should one arrow not let you manipulate your object as desires, try the other one.  Eventually, you will learn which one works best for a particular task.

Contributed by Jack Kennedy, Graduate Student

Graduate Student Update

February 11, 2015 § Leave a comment

Graduate students concentrating in Historic Preservation have been working with professor Jo Leimenstoll to organize a symposium exploring place memory.  We are very excited to have guests Tom Mayes, Deputy General Council, National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Patrick Lucas, Director, School of Interiors, University of Kentucky College of Design.  The symposium will take place March 20th from 9:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.  More information will be forthcoming.

Compass4Fz26 copyIf you are interested in volunteering, please reach out to Mardita Murphy (mmmurph3@uncg.edu) or Audrey Wagoner  (arwaggon@uncg.edu).

Contributed by: Jack Kennedy, Graduate Student

[1st] Year Studio Update

February 9, 2015 § Leave a comment

In the first year studio, we have spent this semester diving into a long project led by Felicia Dean and Tommy Lambeth that involve weaving. Through a combination of Tablet and Back-strap weaving techniques, we are attempting to create a stole that represents a cultural aspect about ourselves. The project has allowed first year students the ability to research and explore the craft of weaving and textiles first hand. In this project, we have had an introduction to Illustrator and Rhino, as well as the laser cutting machine in order to make our tablet cards. Each student was provided the wood to create their own shuttle by which we will attach the weft for our looms. As we begin weaving through the next few weeks, students are encouraged to strongly consider the purpose and representation of the stole by which we are making to describe ourselves.

 

        

In Design Visualization II, Stephanie Brooker is introducing first year to materials by having our class draw the values of materials through different kinds of lighting. We began last week by using different mediums, such as markers graphite, and pens and experimenting with crating a value scale with different techniques. This week, Stephanie guided us through the materials and sample section of the IARc library. We were encouraged to pick different kinds of materials draw them using different techniques and in different kinds of light. This project has been a great way for the class to build on using drawing techniques to define value and having us consider other things such as texture and how some materials react to different kinds of light.

Post and Images contributed by:
Clifton Woods [1st] Year

[2nd] Year Studio

February 4, 2015 § Leave a comment

[2nd] year studio is starting off the semester with a project that involves art from the Weatherspoon Museum. Every student in the class was assigned a painting that we were to analyze and manipulate into a sculpture. The practice sculptures are shown in the picture below. Last Monday, we were required to have a final white model that reflects the painting we were assigned in the best way possible.

Hayden Borders

Hayden Borders

Abby Eckard

Abby Eckard

Kista

Kista

Will Ellis

Will Ellis

Will Ellis

Will Ellis

 

Contributed by: Hayden Borders, [2nd] year IARc

IIDA meets UNCG University Center!

February 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

Last week, members off IIDA went to UNCG’s Elliott University Center to represent the campus organization and spread awareness! They set up a booth with information and spoke to hundreds of students throughout the day about IIDA, the Department of Interior Architecture, and what both do in regard to campus and the community. IIDA members who attended include Vice President, Lakiesha White, and Merchandising/Fundraising Chair, Linda Melendez. Thanks to these ladies for representing IIDA!

Seen below is Linda Melendez

 

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Contributed by: Torrey Orlopp [4th] Year

Graduate Student Update

February 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

Graduate students finished last semester in a whirl wind, like most IARc students do.  Travis Hicks’ studio presented their historic mill adaptive re-use projects to architecture students at UNC Charlotte as well as a panel of experts during a critique in Gatewood.  The projects at Revolution Mills here in Greensboro, and each student chose a different section of the mill to focus on.  Eco-villages, Sustainable communities, Live / Work / Play, Organic groceries, Tea houses, and Boutique hotels were some of the included programs in the projects.

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Audrey Wagoner looks on as a UNC Charlotte professor explains the importance of line weight to her students.

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Material sample boards from Travis Hicks’ Revolution Mills adaptive re-use projects.

Students in Laura Cole’s research methodologies class completed a research project based on the Servant Center and their need to adapt their campus to better meet the needs of the organization and those it serves.  The Servant Center is an organization that works with homeless veterans and their mission is: “To empower the homeless and disabled, particularly Veterans, to become independent, contributing members of our community through housing, healthcare and restorative services.”  Hopes are that students will continue with this project and generate an architectural program for the organization.

This semester has started out a little bit differently than IARc students are accustomed, without a studio.  That’s right they are taking a semester to work on their thesis proposals and literature reviews.  This should give the students a better preliminary view of their thesis work and better prepare them for the studios that will come.  The topics students are working on are multidisciplinary and look at historic preservation, place making, and product design.  We will share progress on these topics later in the semester.

Contributed by: Jack Kennedy, Graduate Student

4th Year Studio Update

January 25, 2015 § Leave a comment

This semester Travis Hicks’ [4th] Year capstone studio is doing things a little bit differently. Students were asked to find a community partner and create their own research project to address an issue they care about in the community. This research will lead into an informed design solution that students can choose to build or digitally model. Projects in the class are very diverse including address Greensboro’s food desert problem, designing a duplex for Habitat Forsyth, redesigning a space for the Veterans Affairs building in Greensboro, and many more! Below is a photo of Kimberly Mott and recent graduate Morgan Cates, who currently works for Habitat Forsyth, touring a vacant duplex in the Boston-Thurmond neighborhood of Winston-Salem.

Cherry StreetPhoto by: Torrey Orlopp [4th] Year